Personal – Mars One School Visit Q&A

I wanted to share something that happens when you regularly visit schools and talk about something awesome like exploring Mars: the job isn’t just answering questions for kids at the school on the day, it also usually means answering questions for kids (and adults) who couldn’t make it or didn’t have time to ask their question on the day too!

After my run of school visits recently one of the teachers at a school I spoke at was bombarded by their 9-10 year olds who didn’t get a chance to ask everything they were curious about, so when I made my usual offer to answer via email they took me up on it. For those of you curious about what sorts of questions I usually get from students and the answers I give them, read on!


Is part of your job to look for any precious stones on Mars? We won’t be looking specifically for precious stones on Mars, but we will definitely spend a LOT of time looking at the rocks on Mars! Studying the rocks on Mars can tell us more about Mars what it might have been like in the past and where the water is. We’ll also have to study the rocks on Mars if we ever want to try to find alien life there, because if we’re going to find fossils or even living alien microbes or bacteria, they’ll be living in or on the rocks!

How do you eat with your helmet on? Inside the habitat you don’t need a spacesuit, so you can just wear normal clothes and eat/drink normally. When you go out onto the surface however you need to wear the bulky spacesuit with the helmet for up to 7 hours at a time. There’s a bag of water inside the spacesuit with a straw next to the astronaut’s head they can sip from, and there’s is a pouch below their chin they can reach down with their teeth to pull up a fruit & cereal bar to eat if they get hungry. The water is pretty easy, but the fruit & cereal bar is really awkward, plus they have to eat all of it straight away so that they don’t have crumbs floating around inside their helmet! Eating with a spacesuit on is really difficult, so most astronauts eat before they put the spacesuit on to go outside.

What does the impact feel like when you land the space craft? Depending on the spacecraft it can be either really gentle like a passenger plane landing, or it can be incredibly jarring and potentially break your back! The space shuttles landed just like a plane, and even though they were going much faster than a jet when they touched down, they could still be very gentle. A Soyuz capsule however fires a single rocket blast a few meters above the ground to make an impact that could kill you a tiny bit gentler! The spacecraft that will land us on Mars will almost certainly use rockets for a lot longer to land much gentler than the Soyuz, but not as gentle as landing like a plane with a space shuttle.

Soyuz landing with retrorockets firing (middle) and impact (right)

What happens if you stay on the surface of Mars longer than one hour? There’s no problem staying on the surface of Mars longer than an hour, and we’ll regularly need to go outside for a lot longer than an hour to make repairs and explore. At the moment though our spacesuits don’t provide any extra protection from the radiation on the surface of Mars, so if we went outside for more than an hour every day then we’d be exposed to too much radiation. We might go outside for 7 hours one day, but then we might stay inside for the rest of the week! It’s all about making sure you don’t go out on the surface more than an hour per day on average, because if we do we’ll increase our risk of cancer and other radiation illnesses beyond the approved limit.

How will you grow fruit and veggies with all the gases in the Mars environment? A friend of mine has been researching exactly what mix of gas would be best for growing fruit and veggies on Mars! The atmosphere on Mars is too thin to grow things outside of a sealed habitat, but she found that if we took the atmosphere on Mars and pressurised it, then added a little bit more oxygen (made by extracting water from the soil then splitting it into hydrogen and oxygen) then you would have the perfect mix of gas for growing plants! Humans couldn’t breathe it because there would be way too much carbon dioxide, but plants would flourish.

What type of plants grow on Mars? No plants yet, but once we start landing greenhouses and habitats there we’ll be able to start! So far Mars One has tested growing radishes, peas, rye and tomatoes and shown that they are completely safe to eat when grown in soil with the same soil with a mix of minerals and heavy metals as we’ve detected on Mars. There are 6 other crops that we know will grow in that same type of soil, but they haven’t finished testing to see if the heavy metals have been absorbed by the plants yet.

The first harvested tomatoes from Mars soil simulant.

Have you discovered any space junk on Mars yet? Depending on who you ask, there’s a few things on Mars some people might call junk that others call “historical sites”! We know the Beagle 2 probe landed on Mars safely in 2003, but it never deployed all it’s panels so it eventually ran out of power and is sitting dead on the surface of Mars. There are rovers like Sojourner and Spirit that have now failed too. Plus there’s stuff on Mars that really is junk – the heat shield that protected the Curiosity rover as it traveled through Mars’s atmosphere was dumped mid-air so that the skycrane could deliver the rover to the surface, plus the skycrane itself crash landed somewhere on Mars afterwards too! There’s a few bits of human junk on Mars, but not a lot – it’s pretty tough to get things there, so we want everything we send to Mars to be as useful as possible.

How can you live without your family? Lots of people in history have had to say goodbye to their friends and family in order to explore places that people have never been before. Most explorers plan to come back again, but millions of people said goodbye to their families forever when they immigrated from places like England to Australia, or from Ireland to the USA. Those families would know that they were starting a new life somewhere else, and while they would miss them they knew that life itself is a one-way mission.

How do you wash your clothes on Mars? We’ll have to be very careful to conserve water on Mars, plus the reduced gravity on Mars means we won’t sweat into our clothes as much as we do on Earth so we probably won’t need to wash our clothes as regularly. There’s still some gravity though, so we’ll either wash by hand in a tub of water or if we’re really lucky someone might design a washing machine that works in the reduced gravity on Mars.

How do you play sport on Mars? We might not be able to play lots of team sports on Mars, and if we do it’ll be really difficult in our spacesuits outside! People have done it though – in 1971 Alan Shepherd played golf on the Moon after sneaking a golf club and some balls onto Apollo 14 before the launch! Mostly we’ll stay fit and healthy by using equipment like you’d see in a gym, but designed to work on Mars.

How do you get materials to Mars to grow crops? The soil on Mars (called “regolith”) has almost everything you need to grow plants, except it doesn’t have any living bacteria or microbes to support the plants. So one option shown in the movie “The Martian” is to use the regolith along with waste from the toilet (after it’s been treated) to make soil that plants will grow in!

What type of safety equipment would you use most of? We’ll use a lot of different safety equipment in all sorts of different ways on Mars, but one of the most important is something as simple as a cable to hook your spacesuit onto! In space it’s VERY important to tether yourself during a spacewalk because you could float away if you aren’t hooked on to the spacecraft, but on Mars hooking yourself onto a cable between you habitat and a rover could mean the difference between finding the habitat in the dark after a long spacewalk, and getting lost in the dark!

Are you hoping to find aliens on Mars? I think we’ll find aliens on Mars, but they won’t be little green men or Marvin the Martian – they’ll be bacteria, microbes, and maybe something like a tardigrade. Tardigrades are these tiny little creatures smaller than a pinhead that are incredibly tough: surviving radiation, freezing cold, blistering heat, and even the vacuum of space! We know that Mars had water and was more habitable than Earth a few billion years ago, so it’s even possible that life started on Mars, hitched a ride to Earth on a meteorite, and we’re actually all descended from Martians!

Tardigrade (Approx. 1mm long)

How do you drink fluid on Mars? You can drink on Mars just the same as on Earth, except water will pour out nearly 3 times slower than it does on Earth. It means that for things like showers, you might get really big droplets instead of the ones you’re used to from your shower at home, but drinking will be just the same.

Will you have a car on Mars? The first people on Mars won’t have a car, but when they first land on Mars they might sit on a rover and have it take them from where they landed to the habitat that the rovers have setup for them. Sending a car or truck for Mars means lots of weigh, and we are only sending just what we need when we first go. In the future though we will definitely want someone to bring a car or big rover we can live inside so we can explore much further from the habitat than we can just walking or sitting on a normal rover.

How high can you jump on Mars? Mars has 38% of Earth’s gravity, so you provided your legs muscles are still as strong on Mars as they were on Earth, you’d be able to jump nearly 3 times higher!

Will you get sick of eating the same food all the time? We have to be really careful about making sure there is lots of variety in our food, because people DO get sick of eating the same thing all the time and it’s important for people’s mood. The very first mission NASA carried out at their Mars simulation mission in Hawaii was to see how they could add variety to the meals while people were living in a white dome with only limited food selections. For 4 months the people inside needed to work out how to use the same few ingredients they had to make all sorts of new dishes. So learning to be creative and take what you have and turn it into something new and different is one of the most important skills a Mars colonist will need to have.

Hi-SEAS in Hawaii

News – April Newsletter

April Awesomeness

We’re only a quarter of the way into 2017, and I already feel like I’ve had enough of an emotional roller-coaster to satisfy me for the rest of the year. That of course is not how these things work, but it’s certainly been a wild ride and all indications are it’ll only get even more chaotic as we edge closer to Mars One’s final selection phase later this year.

March kicked off with a mountain of amazing events at the WOMADelaide festival though! From meeting science heroes and world-renowned explorers, to speaking to thousands of kids about space exploration alongside a¬†former commander of NASA’s Hi-SEAS mission, and a bundle of incredible public events; the WOMADelaide festival was wonderfully coordinated chaos from start to finish … and you can read all about it right here!

Above: Speaking at the University of South Austrlalia’s sold-out “Life On Mars” event alongside Hi-SEAS IV Commander Carmel Johnston and hosted by Angela Catterns.

Far and away the absolute highlight of WOMADelaide though was being able to present Buzz Aldrin’s signature to Robert Jefferies – a 9-year old who’d written to the Australian Academy of Science in late 2016 when Buzz was touring Australia, hoping to get Buzz’s signature for his Dad for Christmas.

You can read the full story about Robert’s letter in the academy’s article, but it was really wonderful to be able to give something which means so much to someone… even if it was just a little piece of paper to me ūüôā

After WOMADelaide the rest of March was a complete flurry of interviews, travel and school visits – speaking to 4,000 primary school students at the Halogen Foundation’s Melbourne event, another 1,000 during six separate school visits, speaking to Gillian O’Shaughnessy on ABC720, Belle Taylor from The Sunday Times, and joining The Daily Edition to talk about Mars One too!

I’ve also been asked to host several new science TV shows that are in the works too, so after filming pilot episodes in March I’m hoping I’ll be able to share more about invading your TV screens soon.

And somewhere in among all this chaos I’ve managed to share all sorts of interesting things with my supporters on Patreon!

For those of you supporting me on Patreon you’ve had several weeks early access to all the public posts, as well as;

  • Reading, Watching & Listening – April¬†2017¬†With all the chaos this month, this is a¬†particularly in-depth look (considerably more than most months) at¬†what I’m reading, watching & listening to and how it’s¬†influencing¬†my writing right now
  • Post Visit Mars One Q&A¬†– After a school visit¬†I invite teachers to email¬†any further questions from their students that might have been missed. Recently a school sent me a whole list of fantastic questions, so I’ve shared my answers so you can see the sort of things usually kids ask!
  • Space ‚Äď Getting To Mars [Part 2: Orbital Mechanics] or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Love Gravity¬†– The first of the “Getting To Mars” series where I make orbital mechanics great again by avoiding equations, boredom or an existential crisis.
  • [Journal] Exciting & Unpredictable – 25 November 2014 – A journal¬†entry from late 2014¬†recognising the “tension and release” of touring and recovery, with an obvious parallel to the quiet few months I had in January/February compared to the chaos now as well as a strong sense of something really big is just over the horizon.

To celebrate the amazing support I’ve had from fans through Patreon¬†since we launched in December, I also ran my first Patreon Giveaway!

Congratulations to the folks who won hats, t-shirts, and even a remote control BB-8 unit… just for being supporters on Patreon! I’ll be putting most of the prizes in the mail this afternoon (and hand-delivering the rest later this month) so keep an eye on your mailboxes.

If you missed out this time don’t despair – sign up to become a Patreon supporter from just $5 a month, and besides early and exclusive access to my articles you’ll automatically be in the running for the next giveaway!


The $25/month Patron level is ram packed with goodies. These patrons now get:
  • Early access to my “Becoming Martian” book drafts,
  • A personal¬†acknowledgement in the final book,
  • A digital copy AND a signed paperback copy when it’s published,
  • AND all the private journal entries and other private content I share.

Click here for all the details on becoming a Patron!


March was absolutely out-of-control, so I’m looking forward to a couple of weeks house-sitting while working on my book –¬†drafts are on the way for $25/month supporters!¬†At the end of April I’ll be back in Melbourne to take part in the Ginger Pride Rally¬†on April 29th, before heading on to speak at more schools and events in Sydney and Canberra.

It’s never dull, so I’m looking forward to sharing the next set of adventures with you all! Keep an eye on the website for regular posts, Patreon for the latest news, as well as Facebook & Twitter¬†–¬†can’t wait to see what April brings!

Stay awesome,
Josh

Personal – Meeting Current Heroes & Cultivating Future Ones [WOMADelaide]

 

Some times there are months that seem to drag out relentlessly without the slightest movement. No matter what you do, opportunities seem scarce, unnecessarily tough to exploit, and the effort you put in doesn’t seem to balance with what you get in return. The days draw out and you wonder if it’s worth it , if you’re making an impact and improving the world by being in it.
And then there are times¬†like this…
I flew into Perth after nearly 2 weeks in Kuala Lumpur – trying to break the emotional slog of being in Perth for 4 months while reconnecting with an old girlfriend living there. As I’d jokingly predicted¬†earlier, reconnecting with the ex went horribly & hilariously wrong – an important reminder to never go back to the carpet store.
The¬†time away certainly broke the slog from the previous few months though: there’s been an incredible surge of opportunities being thrown at me from everywhere, so I’ve been balancing all them with alongside¬†getting myself to Adelaide for the long awaited WOMADelaide festival!
From landing to leaving, I had less than 48 hours in Perth to try and pack up as much of my childhood room as possible, load what I needed for the next month into a bag and a ukulele case, see an old friend, and¬†fly out to Adelaide. Oh yeah, and casually try to submit 7 different abstracts to the 2017 International Astronautical Congress before the May 8th deadline. Generally people attending the conference submit 1 or 2¬†abstracts at most, and spend the rest of their time networking… but apparently I didn’t get the memo. I don’t even know if I’ll be able to be there yet because IAC2017 may clash with Mars One’s final selection phase, but if I am there I’ll apparently be sharing my nonsense with 7 of the 9 different outreach and education categories – only those at the undergraduate & postgraduate education seminars¬†will be spared.

Me after submitting 7 IAC abstracts in less than 24 hours…

After landing I settled into my hotel the folks from WOMAD had organised, had¬†dinner, and was on my way to speak on a fellow comedian’s podcast when I bumped into yet another ex-girlfriend on the street… at 11pm on a Wednesday night… in a city neither of us live in. The podcast was cancelled to boot, because apparently my life is some lame sitcom now, and to top it all off another friend got in touch the next morning (after a month of total radio silence) to say we shouldn’t talk anymore.
Things shifted gears the following evening though, when the University of South Australia (UniSA) hosted an event where Hi-SEAS IV Commander Carmel Johnston and I spoke to Angela Catterns about life on Mars.¬†Carmel and I have emailed for the last few months, but hadn’t met until just before we took to the stage to speak in front of¬†800+ people¬†together! We became fast friends, and had a perfectly balanced dynamic on-stage. It’s clear why she was selected to command NASA’s year-long Mars simulation in Hawaii: she’s incredibly personable and empathetic; cool-headed, firm¬†in her convictions, and clear in her personal boundaries; and above all practical in her actions. Exactly the kind of personality you’d want commanding a human mission to Mars.

Angela Catterns (left) interviewing Carmel Johnston (right) and yours truly

The fun didn’t stop after the event though – that’s when the questions¬†really started! UniSA had organised a VIP Meet & Greet with food for us afterwards, but we were so overwhelmed with questions that neither Carmel or I had much of an opportunity to eat. Several schools had been invited to see us speak, so naturally their students were eager to¬†throw a million questions at both of us while we glanced over their shoulders at the disappearing food trays. The folks from UniSA managed to save us a little something to eat once the crowd started to thin-out, but after an hour-long onstage chat immediately followed by 2 hours of Q&A both of us were wrecked by the time we got to eat and head back to the hotel!
The next morning it was time to kick off the “Make Me A Martian” webcast schools event through Australia’s Science Channel! I worked with the folks from Australia’s Science Channel last year when I premiered “Cosmic Nomad” at¬†the Royal Institute of Australia, so it was an absolute pleasure to be back to “compete” with Carmel in a game show designed to test our Mars knowledge while students all over Australia watched via the live webcast. If you missed it, you can watch Carmel thrash me in the habitat design challenge here.
The wonderful folks from Australia’s Science Channel took Carmel and I out to lunch, but my work definitely wasn’t done yet. I’ve been chatting to a production company in the US for the last year about a project involving space and science communication – I can’t talk about it much yet, and it may never go anywhere, but it was certainly exciting to slip back into the studio and film some pieces to camera for what could be an amazing project in the future.
With the side projects complete, it was finally time to get into the WOMADelaide festival itself! Carmel and I headed to Adelaide’s Botanical Gardens for the official opening ceremony for the festival, enjoying the opportunity to meet some of the incredible people involved in the seclusion of the Artist’s area. The personal highlight was briefly meeting Antarctic explorer, Shackleton Epic Leader and personal hero Tim Jarvis:

Tim Jarvis (left) with Barry Grey (right) during their attempt to recreate Shackleton’s epic journey to reach civilisation and rescue the crew of the Endurance

It’s no secret I’m a fan of Earnest Shackleton and of applying the leadership lessons of the Endurance expedition to a human Mars mission, so it was a genuine honour to meet and chat to a man who had painstakingly recreated that fateful escape from the Antarctic pack ice to safety. The fact that Tim did all of it alongside a ginger Royal Marine commando isn’t lost on me either!
Finally the event I was in Adelaide for had finally come: the WOMADelaide Planet Talks. Carmel and I had an absolutely amazing time¬†speaking to a sold-out audience¬†about “Human Life On Mars”, and it was an absolute honor to meet and have the event hosted by¬†science communication and radio broadcasting legend Robyn Williams.
There was a little surprise organised after the event however which was a great personal reminder of why I love what I do. In late February I’d seen a post through the Facebook page for Australia’s Science Channel, sharing the story of a 9 year old boy who had written to the Australian Academy of Science asking if it were possible to buy Buzz Aldrin’s signature for his Dad for Christmas…

Click for full size

The Academy unfortunately hadn’t been able to get hold of Buzz,¬†so they’d managed to get Professor Brian Schmidt to sign a poster instead. Now it just so happens that as Chancellor of the International Space University, Buzz Aldrin signs every certificate ISU issues. Which means I – the material good-shunning space hobo that I am – had a signature from Buzz Aldrin on a piece of paper hanging on my wall.¬†Since I’m dedicated to reducing my¬†footprint on Earth down a backpack and a ukulele, it was a pretty easy decision to send the Academy a Facebook message and say that I’d like to donate¬†my copy of Buzz’s signature to the family.¬†
So after we’d finished the Planet Talk, Robyn Williams and I invited Robert up on stage to accept the signature and give it to his Dad.¬†It was pretty wonderful to have the Robert’s family attend the talk, and to be able to donate something which means so much to a family that would have otherwise just hung on my wall at my parents place underappreciated.
All in all it’s been a pretty wild few weeks, but things are really just getting started! I’ve been in Melbourne for the last few days starting the final stage of very personal project that’s been¬†on hold for nearly a year and a half (I’ll share in the next few days what’s going on in a separate post for Patrons-only), and I’m about to jump on a plane to Sydney for a day of filming and TV interviews, zipping out to Canberra for the weekend, and then back to Melbourne for school visits as well as a trip to Perth to visit even¬†more schools.¬†
Absolutely no idea what I’m doing in April (or with much of the year generally for that matter) but there’s certainly no shortage of exciting opportunities and potential – I’ll keep you posted!

News – March Newsletter

 

March Madness

Ever have those times when you’re working away quietly, maybe not seeing a lot of direct reward for what you’re doing and maybe starting to question if you’re making an impact… when seemingly out of nowhere every thing absolutely explodes in your face and you’re suddenly running to try to keep up with it all? And your response is to throw even more fuel on the fire to see if you can go even faster?¬†

No? Is that just me? Maybe it’s good I didn’t go into bomb disposal after all…

All my claims last month about “hitting 2017 in the face like a honey badger” have come back to bite me, because now 2017 is giving back more than I bargained for.

There’s a lot of amazing things I can’t share publicly just yet (but can on Patreon), however the biggest public news is that on February 15 the ABC rebroadcast an interview I did on Conversations with Richards Fidler nearly a year ago, and now suddenly every teacher in Australia wants me to speak to their kids!

From March 13th on I’ll be visiting schools in Adelaide, Melbourne, Sydney and Perth to give presentations and do Q&A sessions like this.¬†So if you’re a teacher interested in having me to speak to your students about colonising Mars, or you’re a parents who’d love for me to visit your child’s class, then be sure to get in contactsoon to book before the end of Term 1!

Before I start visiting schools across Australia though I’ll be in Adelaide to speak at the WOMADelaide festival next week! The fine folks from WOMAD have put together a variety of amazing events that team me up with the extraordinary Carmel Johnston – commander of Hi-SEAS IV, NASA’s year-long mock Mars mission in Hawaii.

Together we’ll be speaking about getting to & living on Mars at:

– March 9:¬†“Life On Mars”¬†in conversation with Angela Catterns
– March 10: “Make Me A Martian” webcast with Australia’s Science Channel
– March 11: “Human Life On Mars” in conversation with Robyn Williams

All the Mars One candidates are expecting to hear very soon about when and where the next astronaut selection phase will be, and I’ve also just locked in a bundle of other interesting events later in the year too – stay tuned for updates on all of it that!

And somewhere in among all this chaos I’ve managed to keep things up to date on joshrichards.space – here’s everything¬†I’ve posted publicly over the last month;

  • “Personal ‚Äď Why I Don‚Äôt Get Invited To Writers Festivals Anymore”¬†– Short answer:¬†Mostly because I prefer to tell¬†kids about space toilets &¬†zero-g turds¬†than make¬†polite conversation with poets who think I’m hitting on them
  • “Space – Getting to Mars [Part 1: Overview]”¬†– I’m constantly answering questions about what it might be like to live on¬†Mars, but I’m very rarely¬†asked about the incredible journey¬†to get¬†to Mars. So I’ve kicked off a new series on the trip¬†looking at orbital mechanics, spaceships, the psychology of being in deep space, radiation, and landing people safely on the red planet.

For those of you supporting me on Patreon you’ve had several weeks early access to all the public posts, as well as;

To celebrate the amazing support I’ve had from fans through Patreon¬†since we launched in December, I’m¬†running my first Patreon giveaway this month!¬†I’ll be giving away Martian t-shirt & hats, posters and all sorts of goodies as well as providing a huge amount of exclusive and behind-the-scenes content for supporters as I visit the WOMADelaide festival and speak in schools all around Australia this month.

I’ll launch the giveaway on Monday, but it’ll only be open to Patreon supporters – if you’re not one yet¬†this is definitely the month to sign up!

The $25/month Patron level is ram packed with goodies. These patrons now get:
  • Early access to my “Becoming Martian” book drafts,
  • A personal¬†acknowledgement in the final book,
  • A digital copy AND a signed paperback copy when it’s published,
  • AND all the private journal entries and other private content I share.

February has been crazy, March is going to be absolutely out-of-control, and right now I have literally no idea where I’ll be or what I’ll be doing in April… but I wouldn’t have it any other way. Every day I’m writing about space as well as speaking to kids and adults about exploring beyond the world they know, so whatever insane thing happens next I know I’m doing something I love.

Keep an eye on the website for regular posts, Patreon for the latest news, as well as Facebook & Twitter¬†–¬†can’t wait to see all the chaos unfold this month!

Stay awesome,
Josh

News – February Newsletter

 

Unleash the inner honey badger!

It’s safe to say that¬†the¬†10 months on the road in 2016 with my Cosmic Nomad tour took one hell of¬†a toll, and since it ended the last few months¬†in Perth have been pretty emotionally taxing too –¬†not just processing and revisiting things, but also the challenge of living in a city I have a very checkered history with.

After being knocked¬†back for a job in Melbourne¬†I decided I needed to be anywhere but Perth for a few weeks. So I’ve just spent a week on an island off the coast of Bali (because my inner bogan needed to be exercised)¬†and I’m¬†currently in Kuala Lumpur for the weekend visiting an ex-girlfriend (because I’m an emotional anarchist).

Things are still pretty uncertain, but the time away has already been the right kind of challenging to get real clarity on who I am and how I’m going to keep attacking this year. And I really do mean “attack” because while we wait to hear more from Mars One I’ve already started hitting 2017 in the face like an angry honey badger.

The last few days in particular have been all about jumping in and seeing what happens rather than overthinking things and worrying I’m might not be good enough – applying for a mountain of jobs at Questacon (interviews start next week), chasing up producers for a potential TV show (oh yes), and editing my “Becoming Martian” ahead of it’s publication this year (first drafts available to Patrons later this month).

And somewhere in among all this chaos I’ve managed to keep things up to date on joshrichards.space – here’s everything¬†I’ve posted publicly over the last month;

  • “Personal – Dear Josh in 2020” – A lot of famous folks write open letters to their younger selves as a sentimental kind of “You’ll be okay” & “If only you knew then where you’d wind up”. Because I’m not massively lame this is an open-letter to my future self saying “You’re always getting better so don’t be a nostalgic wanker”.
  • “Space – Choosing a Crew for Mars” – Most folks think “The Right Stuff” is some steely-eyed high-flying aviator, but who wants to be locked inside a tin can for 7 months on the way to Mars¬†with THAT? This looks at how we need folks more like Ernest Shackleton than the Mercury 7 on a Mars mission¬†crew.
  • “Personal – Badgers, Bender & Ink” – Anyone who has seen my 2016 show “Cosmic Nomad” is painfully aware of my ludicurous cartoon tattoos, but you might¬†be surprised to discover they’ve all got layers of meaning deeper than “I want a robot spaceman tattooed on my ass”. Here’s the story behind all of them.

For those of you supporting me on Patreon you’ve had several weeks early access to all the public posts, as well as;

The support from fans through Patreon has grown surprisingly quickly too, with several folks being absolute heroes and signing up for early access to my book drafts and journals! Patreon is a great platform and I’ve started to get a real feel for sharing content through it, so get ready for a mountain of exclusive content there this month!

The $25/month Patron level is ram packed with goodies. These patrons now get:
  • Early access to my “Becoming Martian” book drafts,
  • A personal¬†acknowledgement in the final book,
  • A digital copy AND a signed paperback copy when it’s published,
  • AND all the private journal entries and other private content I share.

As promised 2017 is quickly turning into a rollercoaster, and I honestly don’t know what I’ll be writing in the March newsletter… but it’s safe to assume it’ll involve a lot more honey badger-like behavior as I start ripping up the challenges this year tries to throw at me ūüėÄ

Keep an eye on the website for regular posts, Patreon for the latest news, as well as Facebook & Twitter¬†–¬†can’t wait to see what chaos is unleashed in Februrary!

Stay awesome,
Josh

 

News – January Newsletter

2016 Is Dead – All Hail 2017

Pretty safe to say 2016 was a tougher year than most, but that’s not to say it didn’t have it’s fair share of highlights. I might have been living out of a backpack for most of it, but that didn’t stop me from:

But it looks like 2016 was really just a warm up, with 2017 already shaping up to be even more exciting again.

And somewhere in among all this chaos I’ve managed to launch my new website at joshrichards.space¬†as well. If you’ve missed them, here’s everything I’ve posted publicly over the last month;

For those of you supporting me on Patreon you’ve had several weeks early access to all the public posts, as well as;

It’s been a great first month on Patreon, with people contributing high and low to read more of what’s going on behind the scenes. I’ve spent most of the last 3 weeks transcribing 5 years of my journals, and now that I’ve redacted some of the names I’m much more comfortable sharing them. So to celebrate I’ve decided to remove ¬†the $50/month patron level altogether, making the journals available at the $25/month level!

The $25/month Patron level is ram packed with goodies. These patrons now get:
  • Early access to my “Becoming Martian” book drafts,
  • A personal¬†acknowledgement in the final book,
  • A digital copy AND a signed paperback copy when it’s published,
  • AND all the private journal entries and other private content I share.

So for all the ups and downs of last year, I hope you’re ready for the incredible rollercoaster that 2017 is shaping up to be. Keep an eye on the website for regular posts, Patreon for the latest news, as well as Facebook & Twitter¬†–¬†I’m looking forward to sharing some incredible adventures with you all in 2017!

Best regards,
Josh

 

Personal – “Waiting”

 

Hey everyone,
Here’s my first “personal” post, about my experience waiting to hear about my application to the Hi-SEAS mars mission analog in Hawaii. This month is going to be pretty full on as I try to write 4 articles (2 months worth) to get things started here and on my Patreon page at the same time.

Enjoy, and let me know in the comments what your experience has been with waiting for big life-changing events!

Read More